History of Cialis

Before talking about the history of Cialis, it’s important to understand the history of erectile dysfunction and the predecessor of Cialis.

The history of impotence is a long one. While people in the ancient past didn’t have a little pill to fix their problems, they did believe in other methods of treatment.

Men of the past were not really that much different from men now. Even back then, men suffered from erectile dysfunction, and their problems were relieved by herbs. People in these ancient societies also believed in fertility gods and the like who could take away their sexual powers for one reason or another.

However, the first attempts to create a medication specifically targeting erectile dysfunction was in the 19th century. Scientists of the time tried to cure ED, what they would regularly refer to as impotence, by leechcraft and bloodletting.

Leechcraft involved a physician applying leeches on a person so that it could suck impurities out of the person. Bloodletting involves a physician withdrawing blood from a patient as a form of therapy. Later in the century, there was a popular theory that said the only way to restore sexual function was to abstain from sex for at least a year. Some scientists even tried to cure ED through the use of electrical current. All of these methods proved to be overall ineffective.

A century later, medical sciences began to develop more rapidly. In the 1950s, the most common way men treated erectile dysfunction was through an injection. The injection would be made right in the penis and was extremely painful. The effect of the injection was immediate and prominent. It did come with disadvantages as well. It wasn’t dependent on sexual desire; the erection was just there and lasted until the drug ran through your system. Today, injections are still being used but more rarely.

The last popular method that people used to treat ED that isn’t used so much today is vacuum therapy. Vacuum therapy used a special pump that would stimulate the penis to fill the cavernous body with blood.

Erectile Dysfunction’s Medical Revolution

A revolution somewhat occurred in the field of erectile dysfunction treatment in the early 1990s. American researchers stumbled upon some inhibitors that blocked the production of PDE5, specifically sildenafil. It leads to the creation of the first oral drug to impotence: Viagra. It was a huge breakthrough for medicine. Never before was there a treatment for erectile dysfunction that worked so simply and effectively. One small pill could restore all of your sexual function.

As stated before, and as it often happens in research fields, the discovery of sildenafil as a treatment for ED was a complete accident. A group of researchers were working to develop a medicine that was meant to treat hypertension and angina. The treatment did what it was intended to do. It relieved symptoms of angina, but it had an interesting side effect that scientists reported in their trials. The side effect increased blood flow to the patients’ pelvic areas, stimulating an erection.

The pill was patented in 1996, and the FDA approved it just two years later. Viagra quickly became popular with annual sale reaching $2 billion worldwide in 2008. Even with the emergence of competition like Levitra and Cialis, Viagra still remains the top selling and most well-known solution to erectile dysfunction.

The Rise of Cialis

Cialis, also known as tadalafil, was a successor to sildenafil, but it didn’t get FDA approval until November 21, 2003. The discovery of tadalafil was very similar to that of sildenafil; scientists were looking for a treatment for pulmonary conditions and found the same results as sildenafil.

Cialis’s official history began in 1998. ICOS Corporation partnered with Eli Lilly Company to form Lilly ICOS, LLC to explore and develop the compound it patented in 1994 called IC351. ICOS had been doing trials with IC351 since 1991 but didn’t commercialize on it until it’s partnership. In 2002, the company revealed its findings to the world: a PDE5 inhibitor. The inhibitor was given the official name tadalafil but was marketed under the brand Cialis. It had a half-life of 17.5, which was quite significant compared to sildenafil’s 4-hour half-life. This half-life meant that the effects of Cialis could work for up to 36 hours after a man took it.

The year after revealing their discovery to the world and making an announcement to the American Urological Association, Cialis got its approval from the FDA to treat the effects of erectile dysfunction. In the same year, it was approved for use in Europe as well. The approval put it into direct competition with Viagra. In its competition, it’s done reasonably well. Of the other medications that treat ED, Cialis comes in second in terms of annual sales. It comes second to only Viagra and not by much, considering the 5-year lapse between the FDA approval of the two pills. With its lasting power and affordable prices, the use of the pill for erectile dysfunction is only expected to grow in the years to come.

Cialis wasn’t only approved for treating erectile dysfunction. Its ability to relax the muscle and allow for increased blood flow to certain areas made it a nice option for the treatment of other conditions. It is also marketed under the brand Adcirca to treat Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and was approved by the FDA in 2009. In 2011, it was approved by the FDA to treat Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BHP) as well as treat a combination of BHP and ED symptoms.

Cialis is a powerful drug for the treatment of erectile dysfunction, PAH, and BPH that has a multifaceted history that began with an accidental discovery. It’s an effective drug to treat the conditions it’s intended for, but it can cause side effects. These can include nausea, flushing, headache, muscle pain, and a stuffy nose. Cialis shouldn’t be paired with grapefruit, alcohol, or certain other medications. Consult your doctor to determine if Cialis is right for you.

About Benjamin AbramovDr Benjamin Abramov is a leading fertility specialist and gynaecologist based in London, and is currently Medical Director of City Fertility Ltd. Specialising in pre-implantation genetic screening (PGS) and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), IVF, and the management of recurrent miscarriages, Dr Abramov's ethos is a patient-centred approach, tailoring treatment to each individual case, and putting the needs of his patients first.Benjamin Abramov Facebook Benjamin Abramov Google Plus Benjamin Abramov Twitter Benjamin Abramov Medium Benjamin Abramov Wordpress Benjamin Abramov Blogger